I. The Story

Meet The Dadsumers // The Story

Modern dads are redefining fatherhood by spending more time with their kids, doing a larger portion of the household shopping and spending lots of money. But they are far from all the same. While marketers are waking up to the importance of engaging dads, they often treat them as one huge non-female cohort rather than recognizing the subtle but important differences between them. Earning their engagement and loyalty requires knowing what makes them tick, how they differ from moms and what distinguishes them from each other.

It's no secret that marketers have begun to recognize the growing presence and purchasing power of dads. Not just at the car dealerships, home improvement stores, sporting goods stores and electronics retailers. But at the malls, grocery stores, pharmacies and big box stores, too. Today, dads are shopping everywhere.





Mom 60 mins
Dad 54 mins

United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, American Time Use Survey

There are a number of factors driving more dads to retail, most notably the increasing number of moms in the workplace and the rising number of single dads.










Almost 2/3 of families are dual-income and there are now more than 2MM stay at home dads- double what it was 25 years ago.



Source: Pew Research Center | Read

We're also seeing big shifts in how dads view themselves. While many dads are shopping because they have to, a large number are shopping because they want to. Eschewing the traditional archetypes of the 20th century, 21st century dads want to have a greater role in home and family life.

  • Today's dads spend an average of 1.2 hours more per workday with their kids than dads of the 1970's. 1
  • Half of all dads say they are the primary grocery shopper.2
  • 1 in 4 say they are responsible for meal planning and laundry.3
1Source: Millennial Dads Meet Parenting's Glass Ceiling; CEB Iconoculture
2Source: He Said, She Said: CEB Iconoculture
3Source: He Said, She Said: CEB Iconoculture


Part 2: The Bread Maker
The Bread Maker

II. The Bread Maker

Meet The Dadsumers // The Bread Maker

Increasingly, dads are seeing their role as breadwinner, bread buyer and even bread baker.

He's not the fumbling, bumbling doofus who can't cook or keep the whites white. The dad of today may not be perfect, but he has a plan, the know-how and the pressed khakis or skinny jeans to match. He can do the laundry, whip up dinner and get the kids to the birthday party. Of course he is probably using a laundry capsule, heating up a frozen lasagna (with a fresh salad on the side) and running a few minutes late, but he is making it work. He has his own distinct values, preferences and behaviors. At home and at the store. Today's dad doesn't want to more be like mom. He just wants to be the best dad he can be.



Source: Boston College Center for Work and Family, The New Dad: Caring, Committed and Conflicted, 2011 | Read


Effectively engaging dads goes beyond simply shifting targeting strategies.

For starters, Dads are careful and considered consumers. Contrary to conventional wisdom, they pay close attention to price – though the vast majority say they buy based on quality not price. They also check ingredients and look for where their products are made or grown. Dads are heavily engaged in researching new products and brands through online reviews. They're also much more consultative in their shopping – indicating that their spouse and children have a significant impact on the brands they choose.1

There are also a number of indicators that Dads are a ripe audience for marketers – and not just because of their purchasing power. Dads are more active users of all forms of media than their female counterparts. They're more open to advertising and more likely to engage with brands in social media. They're also more likely to say owning the best brand is important to them.2

Not only are they not moms, they're not all one homogeneous group.

As we started to dig into the dynamics of the modern family and changing roles and expectations of fathers, we saw a series of significant shifts in values, attitudes in behaviors among large groups of dads.

We wondered what might explain the differences in Dads' values and attitudes, as well as their vision of what a dad should (and should not be). Through a series of interviews, we determined that his vision was shaped during two key life stages. First, early adolescence. During this preteen period dads learned what it meant to be a man, and a father. Fact is, however, for much of this time his own dad wasn't around. So our dad-to-be took note of the times when his father was there so he could repeat those behaviors, as well as when Dad wasn't there so he would make sure to be more present with his kids during these formative years. The second key life stage was when our dad-to-be was starting his own family. He was totally responsible for himself, and about to be responsible for at least one other person. This is when he really started to pay attention to financial matters, and realize that they were connected to larger world events. The rise and fall of Alan Greenspan, Enron, the dot.com bubble (and burst), two Gulf Wars, 9-11, the housing bubble (and burst) all influence his feelings of security (or insecurity), and this shared history became a lens through which he now relates to the world.

Meet the Dadsumers: Four distinct segments you need to know.

Our strategy team at Allen & Gerritsen undertook what we believe to be the first such study of dads as consumers, or "Dadsumers" using primary research as well as a wealth of syndicated data from research partners including CEB Iconoculture, YouGov, MRI and Forrester. We created four distinct lifestyle and generational-based segments, and explored them in relation to each other, and to their spouses.

  • Brand New Millennial Dad (ages 30-34)
  • Gen "Why?" Dads (ages 35-39)
  • Dads Facing Fifty (ages 40-49)
  • Late Boomer Dad (ages 50-54)

What emerged were some compelling differences that impact not only who they are as fathers but how they behave as consumers. A myriad of social, cultural and economic factors influenced their lives and shaped their attitudes and behaviors. Wars, recessions, bubbles and bailouts. Ten different presidents. From The Beatles to The Bee Gees to U2 to Radiohead to Coldplay. Each of these segments thinks differently, acts differently, and shops differently. And given that each segment represents millions of men with increasing buying power, these nuances represent millions of dollars to brands. Rather than treating all Dads the same, success requires a deeper understanding of what makes them tick, and how to earn their engagement.





1Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics MarketSight Research comparing men and women age 35-54, HHI $75K+, Children under age 18
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics Analysis
Part 3: Millennial Dad
Millennial Dad

III. Millennial Dad (Ages 30-34)

Meet The Dadsumers // Millennial Dad

Born in the mid- to early 80's, he grew up in the 90's and came of age in the 2000's. The Brand New Millennial Dad has a whole new perspective on life. He married in his very late twenties, his kids are now toddlers or in preschool. Whereas older men have seen their dreams and ambitions to do better than their parents go unrealized, this generation of men knows better than to even think of it. He is also the least likely to actually be married and spends the most time with his children. He is the most likely to live in a city and the most likely to be the primary shopper in the family, the most likely to be making less than his partner, and the most comfortable in his role as a stay-at-home dad. He is extremely liberal minded, but also takes authentic cues from simpler, more traditional times.

His Formative Years

During his adolescence, bikes were freedom, Nintendo 64 ruled, Boy Bands, Britney and Nu Metal exploded and music was free whenever he wanted it. He grew up with more freedom than the younger Millennials that would follow, free to play and explore without hovering parents. He witnessed the shift from analogue to digital as part of the first generation to become fully entrenched in technology that also remembered life before answering machines and call waiting. He was at the forefront of social media adoption and digital experiences, from AOL chat rooms to Napster and Myspace.

He came into adulthood amidst a new war and what would become the worst recession since the Great Depression, all while innovation in tech took off. The US Housing bubble burst when year on year home prices dropped by up to 15%. The job floor collapsed just as he was stepping out of the elevator. His first job might very well have been an internship, or not even on his chosen career path. Communication was changing exponentially, with Facebook, Twitter, Gmail and the iPhone all hitting mainstream.

His Attitudes and Values

He now feels it's important to be a heavily involved, hands-on dad. He worries about "getting it right" and approaches parenthood as an equal partnership. He wants to see images that represent the type of man he is and resents outdated stereotypes like ‘doofus dad,' or being labeled as a babysitter and not being allowed to show emotion.1

Brand New Millennial Dads are much less oriented than dads in general toward more "traditional" values like family, loyalty and courtesy. Brand New Millennial Dads identify much more with values like equality and compassion suggesting a much stronger connection to broader community and their fellow humans. At the same time, they are solidly grounded in who they are and in having control.2

1Source: Missing Men, CEB Iconoculture
2Source: CEB Iconoculture Consumer Insights, 2016



Technology, Media, Advertising and Brands

Brand New Millennial Dads consume more content across all forms of media – both on and offline – than any other dad segment.1

Contrary to popular opinion, Brand New Millennial Dads don't avoid advertising. In fact, of all the Dadsumers, they are most likely to pay attention to all forms of ads. Roughly half of Brand New Millennial Dads say they read/watch/listen to virtually all forms of advertising, with little difference between traditional, digital and in-store advertising. They generally believe advertising is credible, and consider it a good source for learning about new products and brands.2

1Source: Forrester, Consumer Technographics
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics











Source: Forrester

Brand New Millennial Dads are mobile first, multi-taskers. More than half use more than one device most of the time/always. Brand New Millennial Dads show a readiness to communicate, consume content and transact with brands through mobile and they are the most demanding about those interactions. 3 out of 4 are frustrated and annoyed by websites that aren't mobile friendly.1

Brand New Millennial Dads are the most likely dads to engage with brands on social channels, use a brand's mobile app, read a brand blog and read ratings or reviews about brands or services. 36% will visit a brand's website, consistent with most dads. Roughly 6 in 10 Millennial Dads feel more confident if they can research purchases at point of sale. They are least likely to join a loyalty program.2

Brand New Millennial dads are overwhelmingly the most brand conscious. They are the most likely to pay extra for a product with an image they want to reflect (44% say they are willing to pay more for luxury brands). Brand New Millennial Dads have a particular affinity for brands, and say they are the most brand loyal, yet they are also most likely to switch brands. Price is more important than brand name. 80% of them feel that store brands are just as effective as name brands.3

Five Tips for Engaging Brand New Millennial Dads

  1. Don't treat them as some sort of special hero because they are taking an equal role as partner in parenting and home life. For them, there's no question or decision, this is what comes naturally.
  2. Portray the multi-dimensional aspects of his life. Yes, he's a father but his identity and lifestyle have not been sublimated by fatherhood.
  3. Instill confidence. Provide information and resources that help him feel confident in the decisions he's making.
  4. Feed the content beast – uncover all of the opportunities to place relevant content. Make it timely, relevant and valuable.
  5. Brand New Millennial Dads are active advocates for brands and products that interest them. Give them lots of frictionless ways of amplifying your brand messages.



1Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
3Source: MRI
Part 4: Gen 'Why?' Dads
Gen 'Why?' Dads

IV. Gen "Why?" Dads (Ages 35-39)

Meet The Dadsumers // Gen "Why?" Dads

The Gen "Why?" Dad is part Gen-X and part Millennial. Transitioning from early adulthood squarely into fatherhood, his whole existence has shifted and he's questioning everything. He was born in the early 80's, grew up in the early 90's and came of age in the early 2000's. There was a lot of uncertainty in the world, but he was still single and his parents were always there for him. By the time it was time to get a real job and to start a family, things were looking up. He married in his mid to late twenties, his kids are in elementary school and/or preschool. He works and acts responsibly and optimistically, not based on fear or paranoia. He is a Millennial in spirit, but that spirit is being reigned in more and more each day. He is now staring at 40, in a traditional job, with a mortgage, life insurance and a mini-van. He is coming to grips that the best thing he can be is a good dad.

His Formative Years

As a child he was likely a latch-key kid, which imbued upon him a sense of freedom and self-reliance. He only turned off Nintendo to watch Save By the Bell. He watched movies on VHS and listened to music on CD's. The Macarena. Britney Spears. Green Day. The Chicago Bulls. Life was good during the Clinton years.

Life was quite different by the time he graduated college. This was also arguably one of the darkest periods in recent American history, with 9/11, the War in Afghanistan and Columbine. George W. Bush won a highly disputed election. Rolling blackouts happened in California. Kmart, United Airlines, Enron and World Com all filed for bankruptcy, foreshadowing the economic recession that would take place later in the decade.

His Attitudes and Values

In Gen "Why?" Dads we start to see more emergence of values associated with responsibility and family as well as values such as passion, relationship, loyalty and courtesy suggesting these Dadsumers are becoming more oriented toward the close personal relationships in their lives. More solidly grounded in their dad roles, Gen "Why?" Dads are far less motivated by career and other factors than their younger counterparts.1

1Source: CEB Iconoculture Consumer Insights, 2016




Gen "Why"?



Courtesy, Happiness, Enjoyment, Responsibility, Family, Loyalty, Conscience, Relationship, Passion, Independence



Millennial Dad



Equality, Happiness, Success, Conscience, Responsibility, Safety, Authenticity, Independence, Wisdom, Curiosity


Source: CEB Iconoculture Consumer Insights, 2016


Gen "Why?" Dads are entrenched in the daily grind, but dedicated to being present at both work and his kid's activities. He wants to be approachable and his kids to know he's there for them. He is determined to make time for his relationship, as well as give her the "me-time" she needs.

Technology, Media, Advertising and Brands

Much like the Brand New Millennial Dads, Gen "Why?" Dads are heavy content consumers spending 20 hours/week online and 88% of that time consuming content.1

Mobile is their primary route online, and they have high mobile expectations though they are a bit more forgiving than their younger counterparts.2

4 in 10 Gen "Why?" Dads feel more confident in their purchases if they can use their phones to research in-store.3

Gen "Why?" Dads also expect social interactions with Brands. They're actively engaged on social platforms throughout all stages of the customer lifecycle and are more active in all forms of social engagement – reading, commenting, liking and sharing –and, even more so than Gen "Why?" Moms.4

Surprisingly given that they are so close in age, Gen "Why?" Dads are not nearly as focused on organic or environmentally friendly products as Brand New Millennial Dads.

1Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
3Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
4Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics




72%
Brand New Millennial Dad
55%
Gen "Why?" Dad
52%
Dads Facing 50
48%
Late Boomer Dad

I consider myself to be environmentally conscious

74%
Brand New Millennial Dad
52%
Gen "Why?" Dad
34%
Dads Facing 50
23%
Late Boomer Dad

I regularly purchase organic or natural products

Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics

Five Tips for Engaging Gen "Why?" Dads

  1. Amplify the role and importance of fathers. Show fathers as shaping human beings. Emphasize their ability to nurture and guide as their children navigate a world that isn't always safe or friendly.
  2. Recognize the importance and intensity of his relationship with his spouse. As parents and partners they've entered a new chapter. Fresh off the life-altering frenzy of babies, bottles and strollers, they're ready to refocus on and invest in their relationship.
  3. Gen "Why?" dads are starting to reprioritize – declining focus on friends, career and the opinions of others, increasing focus on family. This is a time when they're likely to be more open to discovering brands that fit with their new worldview. Think about how your brand fits with this new paradigm and value set.
  4. Take advantage of the fact that they are the most active of all Dads on social media. Give them reasons and opportunities to engage with your brand, share your content and their love for your brand.
  5. Don't assume they share typically Millennial values. While their device use and expectations are more like Millennials, as they transition into more fully into fatherhood their values are starting to more closely align with older dads.
Part 5: Dads Facing Fifty
Dads Facing Fifty

V. Dads Facing 50 (Ages 40-49)

Meet The Dadsumers // Dads Facing Fifty

The Dad Facing Fifty was born in the 70's, grew up in the 80's and came of age in the 90's. His kids are now entering their teens, so real just got even realer. Bumped and bruised by the economy, he experienced the booming bubbles, only to see them burst and the Twin Towers fall right when he was starting a family and buying his first home. He enjoyed a relatively comfortable life but is now realizing that he will be the first generation to not do better financially than his father did. Even with his wife working too. On the flip side, he has already done more than his father to balance career and family. He witnessed the birth of his children, changed diapers and fed them bottles, and this level of engagement with his kids has continued to this day. But by trying to be equal parts mom and dad, he still feels imperfect. He is also losing his hair, gaining weight, facing fifty and confronting mortality.

His Formative Years

Like Gen "Why?" Dads, his latchkey childhood, when he was free from excessive attention and praise, trained him to be self-reliant and figure things out on his own. He saw the traditional family model break due to a rise in divorces. He ushered in a music video-obsessed culture as a member of the MTV generation. The Space Shuttle Challenger exploded, and the women's liberation movement took place at the same time his mother went to work out of financial necessity. He lived in the shadow of nuclear war with Soviet Union when Russia was the enemy.

When he graduated college he saw the Fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Exxon Oil Spill, WWW Invented, Operation Desert Storm and the first Gulf War, The LA riots after the Rodney King Verdict, The World Trade Center bombing, Nelson Mandela's release from prison and presidential election. The Oklahoma City bombing. The Real World on MTV. Friends. The Simpsons. Nirvana. Monica Lewinsky. The Y2K panic.

His Attitudes and Values

Seeing his own kids now turn into teens, he feels both the pressures and joys of shaping them into the adults they will soon be. Counter to the freedom he had and defined gender roles he saw as a kid, he wants to be more present and influential in his kids' lives, and soak up the time he has with them. He's facing realities about his place in the workforce, whether questioning career growth or realizing he won't be able to retire as early as he'd hoped.

Squarely in middle age, Dads Facing Fifty are starting to put a premium on things like safety, authenticity and justice - values that indicate the importance of trust and mitigating risk. They are also beginning to face aging and to think more about things like health and sexuality as they hold onto images of youthful vitality while they face the big five-O.1

2 out of 3 Dads Facing Fifty say most of their time is devoted to activities with their family.2

As they become more comfortable (or resigned) with who they are, we see big drops in the importance of current trends and appearance in Dads Facing Fifty (sigh.)

1Source: CEB Iconoculture Consumer Insights, 2016
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics



71%
Brand New Millennial Dad
49%
Gen "Why" Dad
25%
Dads Facing 50
14%
Late Boomer Dad

I am influenced by what's new and in fashion

71%
Brand New Millennial Dad
49%
Gen "Why" Dad
25%
Dads Facing 50
14%
Late Boomer Dad

I spend a lot of time trying to look my best


Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics

Technology, Media, Advertising and Brands

Dads Facing Fifty consume more than twice as much content online vs. offline. While younger dads are mobile first, Dads Facing Fifty are equally likely to go online via desktop, laptop or mobile.1

Though not mobile dependent, they do have high mobile expectations. Almost 2/3 expect companies to have a mobile friendly website. Dads Facing Fifty are primed to communicate with brands and consume mobile content. They're transitioning into mobile as a transaction platform. Only 1 in 4 say they feel secure making purchases on their mobile phone.2

Social platforms are emerging as a way for Dads Facing Fifty to interact with brands. More than four in ten say they use social platforms to discover new brands and explore before purchasing. Marketers should be cautious in targeting Dads Facing Fifty on social platforms as they show higher rates of avoiding social ads.3

Dads Facing Fifty have a fairly apathetic relationship with advertising, as only about 25-30% pay attention to advertising, regardless of whether it is in traditional or digital, social or mobile media.

In terms of purchase influences, ratings and reviews outweigh friends and family.4

1Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
3Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
4Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics










25% - 30%

pay attention to advertising, regardless of whether it is in traditional or digital, social or mobile media.


Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics, MRI


In terms of purchase influences, ratings and reviews outweigh friends and family.

Five Tips for Engaging Dads Facing Fifty

  1. Recognize all that he has accomplished in balancing family and career. Validate the importance and influence he has a father – for his children and for the greater good. He is raising the next generation of leaders, researchers, activists and world changers.
  2. Emphasize themes of safety and security/certainty. As he was starting his own family, all Americans' expectations of safety and security were shattered and forever shifted by events like Columbine and 9/11. Sadly, we've come to accept this new paradigm.
  3. Feeling the physical and mental effects of middle age, they're particularly attuned to themes of health and vitality. This is not about wanting to go back to their 20's, rather embracing the wisdom and confidence that comes with age and, at the same time, beginning to more fully experience all that life has to offer.
  4. Help them transition to mobile as a transaction platform by making it easy for them to search products, find the information they need and feel secure providing payment information.
  5. Dads Facing Fifty are selectively engaged in social media. They're much more averse to social promotion so engagement has to be organic. Brands have to earn their way into social engagement by providing content that these dads seek out.
Part 6: Late Boomer
Late Boomer

VI. Late Boomer (Ages 50-54)

Meet The Dadsumers // Late Boomer

The Late Boomer Dad was born in the free spirited 60's, grew up in the 70's and came of age in the Reaganomics 80's. His kids are now in high school and/or college, but he might also have very young children from a second marriage. His wife was more likely to stay home or work part time and he worked very hard to afford the best for his kids, and continues to do so, knowing he will likely have to work into his late 60's. His values are fairly traditional, and he doesn't have a lot of time for bullshit. His time is precious and he wants to start living and doing the things he worked so hard to do. He is wrestling with the conflicting goals for his retirement and his children's college education(s), and the fact that his parents need care.

His Formative Years

The Late Boomer Dad's childhood was marked by long gas lines, episodes of The Brady Bunch and the transition from eight-tracks to cassette tapes. He grew up in the wake of the formative events early Boomers (Vietnam War, Woodstock, the Kennedy assassination, Watergate). He experienced transformative movements for people of color, women and the gay community. Pop culture for him was disco, mood rings, and pet rocks. The Bee Gees topped the charts.

He himself graduated college in the mid 80's and entered the workforce a time of terribly low employment rates and a devastating stock market crash, cementing his distrust in large institutions. He endured high rates of unemployment. The stock market drops 22.6% "Black Monday". Sexuality and gender roles were challenged. The AIDs epidemic took hold.

His Attitudes and Values

The Late Boomer Dad is learning he has less control and needs to let his kids navigate the world with less of his help and protection. He feels pride when witnessing the payoff of the values he instilled in his kids. As the empty nest comes into view, he faces the reality that college tuition and aging parents will require him to put off retirement.

Late Boomer Dads values are very consistent with their younger cohorts - Dads Facing Fifty. We begin to see the emergence of notions like duty and integrity - values that are reflections of one's orientation to the broader society. As other values shift, family rises to the top as the dominate motivator for older dads.1

Despite coming of age during a period of conspicuous consumption, Late Boomer Dads are least likely to be concerned with owning the best brands and impressing others.


1Source: CEB Iconoculture Consumer Insights, 2016





Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics


Technology, Media, Advertising and Brands

Just because they're older, doesn't mean they're less digital. Late Boomer Dads spend an average of 20 hours of week online and they are actually less likely to be reading the print forms of newspapers or magazines than younger dads.1

Less than half of Late Boomer Dads say they're always willing to try new things. Late Boomer Dads have more moderate expectations when it comes to mobile. Late Boomer Dads are comfortable with simple mobile engagements like email and text. They're just beginning to engage more deeply in content like video and cautious when it comes to mobile transactions. Even though expectations are lower, more than half expect a mobile friendly experience.2

Late Boomer Dads use social platforms to discover & explore. Late Boomer Dads are more passive users of social platforms than other Dadsumers. Almost half of Late Boomer Dads say they avoid brand messages on social platforms.3

Late Boomer Dads pay the least attention to all forms of advertising among all segments, and compared with all Dads. In fact, this segment is the most likely to avoid most advertising and are most averse to digital, social and mobile advertising.4

Late Boomer Dads are the most brand loyal, most likely to prefer American-Made products and most aware of where products are made.5



Five Tips for Engaging Late Boomer Dads

  1. This is very much a pull yourself up by the bootstraps generation – believing in individual responsibility, hard work and sacrifice as the path to success. He is secure in his views and his ability to make the right choices and he needs very little guidance from outside sources. Appeals that play to image or status will fall flat with this audience.
  2. He is much more focused and selective in his content consumption, broadcast television is the best route to reaching him – preferably non-skippable content like news and sports.
  3. While his mobile expectations are lower – they are still significant. He doesn't default to mobile engagements as with the younger Dads but he is engaging several times per day – particularly when away from home or work.
  4. Social platforms are not a valued form of engagement for all but a very small proportion of Late Boomer Dads. Don't bother.
  5. Late Boomer Dads are least open to discovering new brands but the most brand loyal. The extra effort required to earn their loyalty will likely pay off.

When targeting the modern dad, marketers must pay close attention to the nuances that differentiate each of the Dadsumer segments, and carefully design engagements that speak to that particular cohort's attitudes and behaviors.  Because while a thoughtfully executed social strategy might work for one Dadsumer, a more targeted mobile strategy might align better with another.

Marketers who want to win with one or more of these Dadsumer audiences need to dig in and understand what really matters to each of them because they have their own distinct values, preferences and behaviors at home and at the store.

Regardless of the approach – or the engagement strategy – one universal truth that unites them is: they don't want to more be like mom, they just want to be the best dad they can be.




1Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
2Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
3Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics
4Source: Forrester Consumer Technographics




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